Life’s Soundtrack – Some Seldom Heard Folk Songs in the Morning (Video)

One of the downsides of listening to so much new music is that I don’t have or should I say, take the time, to listen to older music, i.e the music already in my music library. So this morning, I took the iPod with me on my trip to Target,here is the soundtrack that accompanied me……it started and ended with songs from Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer – good stuff…..

Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer

1. “Gentle Arms of Eden” – one of my favorite tracks from Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer. What a shame that Dave left us so soon!

2. “I Know it’s Love” – Lynn Miles – I don’t listen to Lynn’s music often enough, note to self check out her latest album -

3. “Uncle Dudley” – Paul Siebel - Me, Myself.Music and Mysteries post

4. “Paper Bag” – Driftwood Fire – I saw tonight I never wrote anything about this album – time to re-listen!

5. “Mirrors” – Eric Bogle

6. Keep a Good Man Down” – Rob Lutes & Rob MacDonald (Rob Lutes Bravest Birds, Truth&Fiction posts)(

7. “When My Tears Break Through” – Greg Trooper  (Incident on Willow Street, Between a House and a Hard Place posts

8. “Migrant Mothers” – Ben Bedord (What We Lost, Land of Shadows posts)

9. “The Heart of the Working Man” – Tom Russell

10. “Veteran’s Day” – Tom Russell

11. “Frank to Valentino” – Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer

12 “The Power and the Glory” - Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer

Here’s the late Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer performing “Gentle Arms of Eden”…..

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

Morning Music – “One Day” – Batdorf and Rodney – don’t we wish!

So for today’s morning music I was going to use the Jefferson Airplane’s cover of Fred Neil’s “The Other Side of this Life” but after my half sun salutations and a nice quiet yoga set on the 21 Day Yoga Challenge I thought it didn’t feel quite right! If you want, you can watch it here
Here’s a post I did a while back about the role of Batdorf and Rodney in my musical journey…..

Off the ShelfSo sometime in 1971 or 72, I was walking through the  Graham Area lobby at the University of Florida and two guys were playing guitars and singing. I sat down and listened and was blown away by the songs. When they finished, I asked if the songs were theirs and they said, no they were covering Batdorf and Rodney. Within a matter of days, you know I was at the local record store looking for their album!! What I found was Off the Shelf and that album has been “off the shelf” and on my record player, in my CD player and now on my mp3 player for the last forty years.

As a duo, they only recorded three albums in the 70s before they parted ways. John went on to become a member of the group Silver, who recorded one album and had one hit “Wham Bam” that climbed as high as # 16 on the Billboard Charts.

Since then John Batdorf has recorded albums with James Staley and Michael McClean. In 2006, he produced his first solo album Home Again and since then has produced two more albums Old Man Dreamin’ and One Last Wish. All three are fine albums. In 2008 Batdorf and Rodney reunited for a special on XM Radio that resulted in them recording again, and the result was Still Burnin’ and they still are!!

All of this leads me to today’s mid-morning music, “One Day” from the album Off the Shelf and don’t we all wish that the sentiments expressed in the song, would come true!!

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

Morning Music – March 18, 2014 from Jerry Jeff and John Sebastian!!

Hill Country RainOk so when I started this blog, my idea for morning music was to play something that made me happy! Kinda’ a morning pick me up that we all need! So here we go – after reading and listening to both John Sebastian and Jerry Jeff the other day, I started to think about songs that they sing that put me in a good mood! Here’s three of then, two from Jerry Jeff and one from John Sebastian – with Jerry Jeff we’ll dance in the Hill Country Rain and then ride down that road with Curly and Lil because you know – “It’s good times when they get here….” and the John Sebastian is gonna’ painted rainbows all over your blues!! Have a good day y’all!!

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

Morning Thoughts about Website and Music from Tom Rush!

Over the last couple of months I’ve split my time between this blog and its sister blog FreeWheelin’ Music Safari. I have been posting at the Safari new explorations into the world of prog rock, jazz, New Age and Blues and the plan was to keep this blog for Folk, Bluegrass, Roots Rock and Americana. That still may be how it works out, but tonight I was thinking that maybe what would be better is to keep this blog more true to what I originally wanted to do and that is to write about the music I’ve been listening to over the last 50 years. I am constantly amazed when I mention a musician’s name from the past and the young folks at work don’t have a clue about who that is! Anyway what I was going to do was write about those folks and try to get some information about them out there. What the blog morphed into was me exploring new music and having little time for my old favorites! I though tonight that maybe I’ll keep this blog for my favorites and the Safari for explorations into all types new music, with links to both blogs on the sites. Maybe it will work and maybe it won’t, but tonight with that in mind I turned the iPod to an old favorite Tom Rush. Tom RushTom Rush has had an interesting career. He started out in the 60s as part of the Greenwich Village folk scene. He recorded five albums between 1962 and 1967 the first Tom Rush Live at the Unicorn on Nightlife(released for the first time on CD in (2012) and then two each on Prestige and Elektra.. I started listening to his music in 1968, when the classic album The Circle Game was released. That album included covers of songs from Joni Mitchell, James Taylor and Jackson Browne well before anyone knew who they were! His covers of “The Circle Game” and “Urge for Going” were just flat-out great in my opinion. He also added a couple of songs of his own including the classic “No Regrets” and “Rockport Sunday” a great guitar piece. Tom went on to record several albums on Columbia. Merrimack County. Wrong End of the Rainbow, Tom Rush and Ladies Love Outlaws. His recording career stopped with Ladies Love Outlaws. Here’s what Steve Leggett writes in his biography at AllMusic about Tom:

With his warm and slightly world-weary baritone voice, solid acoustic guitar playing, and gifted if hardly prolific songwriting skills, Tom Rush was one of the finest and most unsung performers to come out of the ’60s urban folk revival…..   …. A careful, unhurried songwriter, he was also a fine song interpreter, and had a knack for finding just the right song from new songwriters, being the first to introduce work from then-new songwriters likeJoni Mitchell, James Taylor, Jackson Browne, Murray McLauchlan,William Hawkins, and David Wiffen, among others, and found ways to breathe new life into any number of traditional folk, country, and blues numbers, as well.  Full Biography

What I knowHe continued to tour. In 1999,  For years I know he was always in Philly right after Thanksgiving. No Regrets:The Very Best of Tom Rush was released and it even contained a new song “The River Song”. Then in 2009 he signed on with Appleseed Recordings and he his first studio album in 35 years What I Know was released and it’s a good one!! You can check out his complete discography here. So last night, on the way to work at Target, I listened to several of the tracks on the fist half of What I Know. Then on the way back I listened to songs from No Regrets: The Very Best of Tom Rush that come from those early years including:”San Francisco Bay Blues”, “Mobile Line” and “Panama Limited”  These tracks especially Panama Limited showcase Rush’s fine guitar playing. Back to What I  Know…Richie Unterberger writes this in his review at AllMusic:

The songs are a comfortable mix of Rush originals (only five; he’s never been the most prolific writer), the traditional song “Casey Jones,” and nine choices of outside material. The most renowned of the other writers being Eliza Gilkyson (who composed “Fall into the Night”), and the most surprising choice of material, the CD-closing “Drift Away,” Rush rearranging that ’70s soul hit into something suitably folky and reflective. The good-natured riding-into-the twilight feel of this record might guarantee it won’t cause any earthquakes, but Rush has never been that kind of artist, and this record is a solid continuation of the mood he’s largely followed all his musical life. Full Review

So let’s kick off our Saturday morning with Tom performing Eliza Gilkyson’s “Fall into the Night” one of my favorites!

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

Morning Music from Trumpeter – Avishai Cohen!

Avishai Cohen   So yesterday I wrote that as I was listening to Omer Avital’s Suite of the East, I was impressed y the trumpet playing of Avishai Cohen. Evidently I am not the only one impressed by his talent, as he was voted the rising star trumpeter in the 2012 Downbeat Jazz Critics Poll. Here’s some background on Avishai from Wikipedia:

Avishai Cohen Is a New York City-based jazz musician originally from Tel Aviv, Israel. Cohen is an internationally recognized jazz trumpet player, composer, and bandleader. His playing style reflects a heavy influence from the bebop and post-bop traditions. However elements of avant-garde jazz, and jazz fusion, as well as other contemporary styles can be heard in Cohen’s playing as well. Cohen attended the Berklee College of Music and began establishing himself within the jazz community after placing third in the prestigious Thelonious Monk Jazz Trumpet Competition..Continue Reading

Now for some morning music from Avishai – notice and Omer Avital is playing bass!

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

Morning New Age Music from the Bombay Dub Orchestra – Tales from the Grand Bazaar!

Bombay Dub OrchestraYesterday morning I decided that I’d check out what’s new  in the world of New Age Music and what better place is there to do that, than Echoes.org. So I surfed on over there and looked at the Top 24 Albums for October my curiosity peaked quickly when I read the name of the band that holds the number two spot the Bombay Dub Orchestra with a name like that, they have to be checked out!! At their website I read…..

Bombay Dub Orchestra was formed almost ten years ago following a trip to Bombay, India, by Garry Hughes and Andrew T. Mackay. They’d gone to record with the city’s strings orchestra a few years earlier and decided to take advantage of the relationships they’d built up with musicians in India to create their own project. It took another three years to talk about the idea and a further three years to write, record and release their debut self-titled album. The album featured lush, cinematic, downtempo music. Ambient electronica and Western classical influences were fused with distinctly Indian instrumentation. A large string orchestra, soloists and vocals were recorded in Bombay and additional vocals and instruments were recorded in London. Full Biography

Tales from the Grand BazaarThe number two album on the Echoes Top 25 Albums for October is their recently released third album  Tales From the Grand Bazaar. The album was recorded in Kingston, Jamaica, London, Bombay, Istanbul, LA & New York and features the likes of Sly & robbie, Asad  Khan and Soumik Datta. If you are like me you may have no clue that Sly & Robbie are a prolific Jamaican rhythm section and production duo, associated primarily with the reggae genre, or that Asad Khan is the new age sitar maestro from Mewati Gharana. Or what the Mewati Gharana is – from Wikipedia:

The Mewati Gharana is an apprenticeship clan and musical family (Gharana) of Hindustani classical music founded in the late 19th century by Utd. Ghagge Nazir Khan of Jodhpur. With its own distinct aesthetic and stylistic views and practices, the gharana is an offshoot of the Gwalior Gharana and acquired its name after the region from which its founding exponent hailed: the Mewat region of Rajasthan. The gharana gained visibility and following the latter-half of the 20th Century after acclaimed contemporary vocalist Pt. Jasraj became popular in the realm of Hindustani Classical music at the same time and is viewed as a figure who revived and popularized the gayaki. Read More

and let’s not forget, or give the impression that I know who Soumik Datta is! According to his website he is a….

28 year old ”British Sarod Maestro’ -Time Out, and composer, Soumik Datta is fast being recognized as “one of the the biggest new music talents in Britain” -Vogue.  The British Council UK, tour him on a regular international circuit as an ambassador for the Arts. A resident artist for the London based Alchemy Festival and the Rich Mix cultural foundation he has led groundbreaking new arts projects earning him an international reputation today.   His top collaborators include Beyonce Knowles, Nitin Sawhney, Raghu Dixit, Bill Bailey, Olivier award winning Akram Khan, Mercury Award winner Talvin Singh, Shankar Ehsaan Loy and Javed Akhtar.   Protege of the legendary Sarod maestro, Pandit Buddhadev Das Gupta, Soumik is also a Masters graduate of Trinity College of Music. His command on Sarod combined with his flair for contemporary composition makes him ‘a unique artist in the vanguard of new British music’ BBC3. Read More

A Sarod? What’s a Sarod?? Time for Wikipedia:

The sarod (or sarode) (Bengali: সরোদ) is a lutelike stringed instrument of India, used mainly in Indian classical music. Along with the sitar, it is among the most popular and prominent instruments in Hindustani (northern Indian, Bangladeshi and Pakistani) classical music. The sarod is known for a deep, weighty, introspective sound, in contrast with the sweet, overtone-rich texture of the sitar, with sympathetic strings that give it a resonant, reverberant quality. It is a fretless instrument able to produce the continuous slides between notes known as meend (glissandi), which is important to Indian music. Full Article

Oh, it’s like a sitar or an oud, got it! So now I not only have the Bombay Dub Orchestra to check out, but I also have all their collaborators to check out – all together now – “Too Much Music – too little time!! Here’s “The Orange Terrace” from Tales From the Grand Bazaar!

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

Morning Music – Tom Paxton with memories of The Lions Head

Tom PaxtonSo once again as I closed in the market at Target, for the second night in a row, a forgotten song came on “the jukebox in my mind”. This time it was Tom Paxton;s “You should have seen me throw that ball”. Certainly the song is not one instantly recognized as a Paxton standard but never the less one I
always liked! I guess it popped into the mix because of thoughts about Prine and Goodman and maybe even thoughts about whether the Eagles would be throwing the ball today! So this morning I looked for a video, knowing that I’d never find one, but I did find the song on Tom’s MySpace Page and you can listen to it here.

As I did look though up popped this video of Tom performing his song the title track from his album Comedians & Angels. The video is a portion from a June, 2008 HBO program, “Live At The Bitter End ” in Greenwich Village. This was a tribute to Liam Clancy who was to pass on December 4, 2009.

Now to prove that this video is being used for educational purposes I went to Google to find out about The Lions Head and found this article from the New York Times that speaks to the core of Tom’s song….by Clyde Haberman

They’ve been shooting at Dermot McEvoy’s regiment for a while. Their aim is now getting distressingly good.

 

One by one, at an ever-faster pace, old Lion’s Head regulars are dying. The Lion’s Head was a bar, a few steps down from Christopher Street in Greenwich Village. Some bars are special. This one was.

 

For three decades before it, too, died, in 1996, it was a haven for writers and other wastrels who went there to drink, of course, but also to joke and argue and swap stories, some of which may have had the added advantage of being true. Mr. McEvoy said Jimmy Breslin once told him that “there’s nothing better than going to a bar and lying to your friends.”

The roster of the Lion’s Head fallen has grown rapidly these last few years: writers like Norman Mailer, Frank McCourt, David Markson, Wilfrid Sheed and, just the other week, Lanford Wilson; actors like Jack Warden and Val Avery; newspapermen like Vic Ziegel, Sidney Zion and Dennis Duggan. Add the folk singer Liam Clancy, the nightclub impresario Art D’Lugoff and the boxer José Torres. If the lineup seems top-heavy with men, well, that’s how it was.

 

There are others. One is Paul Schiffman, a longtime bartender and sometime poet, who died in January. He was an often-irascible man, with a growl that made some wonder if he was trying to put the cur in curmudgeon. One day when he answered the phone, the person on the other end asked if the Head, as regulars called the place, had a happy hour. “Yeah,” Mr. Schiffman said, “8 o’clock. As soon as I’m off.” Then he slammed down the phone. Read More

Hum – you know what I think, we all miss Tom’s friends night and day!!

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

Morning New Age Music from the Bombay Dub Orchestra – Tales from the Grand Bazaar!

Bombay Dub OrchestraYesterday morning I decided that I’d check out what’s new  in the world of New Age Music and what better place is there to do that, than Echoes.org. So I surfed on over there and looked at the Top 24 Albums for October my curiosity peaked quickly when I read the name of the band that holds the number two spot the Bombay Dub Orchestra with a name like that, they have to be checked out!! At their website I read…..

Bombay Dub Orchestra was formed almost ten years ago following a trip to Bombay, India, by Garry Hughes and Andrew T. Mackay. They’d gone to record with the city’s strings orchestra a few years earlier and decided to take advantage of the relationships they’d built up with musicians in India to create their own project. It took another three years to talk about the idea and a further three years to write, record and release their debut self-titled album. The album featured lush, cinematic, downtempo music. Ambient electronica and Western classical influences were fused with distinctly Indian instrumentation. A large string orchestra, soloists and vocals were recorded in Bombay and additional vocals and instruments were recorded in London. Full Biography

Tales from the Grand BazaarThe number two album on the Echoes Top 25 Albums for October is their recently released third album  Tales From the Grand Bazaar. The album was recorded in Kingston, Jamaica, London, Bombay, Istanbul, LA & New York and features the likes of Sly & robbie, Asad  Khan and Soumik Datta. If you are like me you may have no clue that Sly & Robbie are a prolific Jamaican rhythm section and production duo, associated primarily with the reggae genre, or that Asad Khan is the new age sitar maestro from Mewati Gharana. Or what the Mewati Gharana is – from Wikipedia:

The Mewati Gharana is an apprenticeship clan and musical family (Gharana) of Hindustani classical music founded in the late 19th century by Utd. Ghagge Nazir Khan of Jodhpur. With its own distinct aesthetic and stylistic views and practices, the gharana is an offshoot of the Gwalior Gharana and acquired its name after the region from which its founding exponent hailed: the Mewat region of Rajasthan. The gharana gained visibility and following the latter-half of the 20th Century after acclaimed contemporary vocalist Pt. Jasraj became popular in the realm of Hindustani Classical music at the same time and is viewed as a figure who revived and popularized the gayaki. Read More

and let’s not forget, or give the impression that I know who Soumik Datta is! According to his website he is a….

28 year old ”British Sarod Maestro’ -Time Out, and composer, Soumik Datta is fast being recognized as “one of the the biggest new music talents in Britain” -Vogue.  The British Council UK, tour him on a regular international circuit as an ambassador for the Arts. A resident artist for the London based Alchemy Festival and the Rich Mix cultural foundation he has led groundbreaking new arts projects earning him an international reputation today.   His top collaborators include Beyonce Knowles, Nitin Sawhney, Raghu Dixit, Bill Bailey, Olivier award winning Akram Khan, Mercury Award winner Talvin Singh, Shankar Ehsaan Loy and Javed Akhtar.   Protege of the legendary Sarod maestro, Pandit Buddhadev Das Gupta, Soumik is also a Masters graduate of Trinity College of Music. His command on Sarod combined with his flair for contemporary composition makes him ‘a unique artist in the vanguard of new British music’ BBC3. Read More

A Sarod? What’s a Sarod?? Time for Wikipedia:

The sarod (or sarode) (Bengali: সরোদ) is a lutelike stringed instrument of India, used mainly in Indian classical music. Along with the sitar, it is among the most popular and prominent instruments in Hindustani (northern Indian, Bangladeshi and Pakistani) classical music. The sarod is known for a deep, weighty, introspective sound, in contrast with the sweet, overtone-rich texture of the sitar, with sympathetic strings that give it a resonant, reverberant quality. It is a fretless instrument able to produce the continuous slides between notes known as meend (glissandi), which is important to Indian music. Full Article

Oh, it’s like a sitar or an oud, got it! So now I not only have the Bombay Dub Orchestra to check out, but I also have all their collaborators to check out – all together now – “Too Much Music – too little time!! Here’s “The Orange Terrace” from Tales From the Grand Bazaar!

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

2013 Americana – Peter Cooper’s Opening Day

opening_daySo yesterday (oops it was actually Sept 10th) was the release date of Peter Cooper’s new album Opening Day  I first Peter Cooper album to become part of my library was Mission Door after that came You Don’t Have to Like Them Both with Eric Brace. And then The Lloyd Green Album and The Master Sessions  again with Eric Brace. I could list a few more but you get the picture, Peter Cooper is a favorite of mine. So I was excited to hear the new album, and just as excited after hearing it because it’s great!! I’ll write more later but for now I’ll let you hear about it from his website:

It’s a big week for Peter Cooper, the athletically built, Grammy-nominated Red Beet Records recording artist, award-winning journalist, soft-hearted educator and doting father who is definitely not hiding behind a third-person narrative right now. Peter’s Opening Day, which many drop-jawed critics are calling “The best album since Beethoven,” will be released Tuesday, Sept. 10. It is Cooper’s finest work, and it includes brilliant steel guitar work from pedal steel guitar Hall of Famer Lloyd Green as well as contributions from genius-level cohorts including Jen Gunderman, Julie Lee, Kieran Kane, Richard Bennett and the talented-though-bald Eric Brace. Read More

For now though, I’ll leave you with a track from the album “Grandma’s Tatoo” Dare I say again that it’s a favorite!!

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare

Today in Music – 1967- The Who visit The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour!!

The Who Explosion
On this date 46 years ago, The Who gave a smashingly memorable performance on The Smothers Brothers Show. They performed their hit “My Generation” – not so memorable yet. At the end of the song, they started in “Whoian” fashion to destroy their instruments. Townsend smashes his guitar against the amps and Moon is knocking down his drums. Suddenly, the bass drum explodes…. Moon had it rigged to explode only the stagehand put in just a wee bit too much explosive, resulting in Moon’s leg being cut, and Townsend’s hair getting singed and his hearing permanently damaged!!

Here’s the video!

<

FacebookTwitterStumbleUponTumblrPinterestShare